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Captured on Film


I've been to two picnics lately where for the first time since my childhood, disposable cameras were brought out to play. I think it is creative to whip these out in a world where every single person has a professional-grade camera in their pocket at all times. The not-knowing is the appeal, I think, just snapping a picture and the delayed gratification of figuring out what the final product is. The inability to take a million shots and micromanage which one you want to post. I got both of these pictures today, and I noticed that in both shots I look much better (in my own eyes) than I typically do in photos. I think it's because when it's a digital camera, you're not thinking of all of the ramifications of a bad photo, the social media culture that has so much emotional baggage attached to it: the analog nature of the experience makes you just experience the moment.



The Production:

An immersive art installation that is a series of photo opportunities, however, audiences must check their phones in at the door. They are given a disposable camera each, and get to play in the world of visual spectacular without the pressure of looking their best or capturing the perfect moment. At the end of the experience, they are walked into a room with a large screen, and see candid photos that were taken of them in the experience, and actors read spoken word poetry about the fleeting nature of memory, and the pressures of social media. They get to keep the disposable cameras and develop the film at their own pace after the show, taking the reminder of this analog experience with them.



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